The Negative Effects of Cyberstalking on Victims

Posted on Oct 27 2015 - 11:28pm by Admin

OnlineThe world has gone online. And it’s one thing to be grateful for. People can connect with their loved ones, gain access to a vast amount of information, and form communities. Despite these upsides, being online comes with many repercussions. One of them is dealing with stalkers.

It is completely acceptable to view someone else’s social networking profiles, but some people go overboard. Their activity reaches a point where it threatens the security of others. Cyberstalkers are not different from classic stalkers — except that they use technological means to facilitate their deed.

Counselors and criminal lawyer in Houston explain that cyberstalking has many negative effects on victims. Here are some of them.

Fear and Confusion

When a victim notices that something is wrong, they will feel an overwhelming sense of fear. If this fear isn’t justified, they are likely to believe that things are unreasonable. They may be even led to believe that they are just overreacting. In turn, they will feel confused and frustrated all at once.

Self-Blame

When there are no explanations that validate the victim’s confusion and frustration, they run the risk of blaming themselves. They may convince themselves that everything is their fault. If this mindset prevails, the victim may experience anxiety, panic attacks, or worse, depression.

Irritability and Anger

Some victims may feel irritable toward the harassment. At times, they will feel angry. If the pestering does not stop, the victim may resort to aggression. They may even harbor homicidal thoughts.

Cyberstalking also affects the social and professional facets of the victim’s life. They may feel insecure and find it hard to trust others, given that they have experienced this kind provocation.

Some people use the Internet to harass others. If you keep receiving offensive messages and threats online, keep copies of these communications for documentation. As much as possible, do not confront the perpetrator. Report them to the authorities.